Delirium Research Hub Investigator Spotlight: Chris Hughes

Every other month, the Delirium Research Hub selects an investigator and research study included in the Delirium Research Hub to feature as a Spotlight Investigator. This month, we are featuring Dr. Chris Hughes, MD, for his study “Role of Endothelial and Brain Injury in Acute and Long-term Brain Dysfunction,” which observed that higher levels of markers of blood-brain barrier injury in adults with respiratory failure and/or shock was associated with worse global cognition at 3 and 12 months post-discharge, while elevated levels of neuronal and endothelial injury markers were associated with worse cognition at 3 months post-discharge.  You can find this and similar studies in the NIDUS Delirium Research Hub.Photo of Dr. Chris Hughes (white male with brown hair wearing suit and tie) next to text reading: Role of Endothelial and Brain Injury in Acute and Long-Term Brain Dysfunction Study Neurologic and endothelial injury biomarkers have been associated with longer delirium duration during critical illness. It is unclear, however, whether these injury markers are associated with poor long-term outcomes following admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). This prospective observational study of 419 adults with respiratory failure and/or shock (mean age 59 years) determined whether plasma levels of neuronal injury (UCHL1 [ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1] and BDNF [brain derived neurotrophic factor]), endothelial injury (E-selectin and PAI-1 [plasminogen activator inhibitor-1]), and blood-brain barrier injury (S100β [S100 calcium-binding protein]) measured within 72 hours ICU admission were associated with cognitive and functional outcomes. Higher S100β was independently associated with worse global cognition at 3 and 12 months post-discharge. Higher E-selectin and UCHL1 were associated with worse global cognition at 3 months only. Higher S100B and E-selectin were associated with greater impairment in activities of daily living at 3 months. These findings suggest that blood-brain barrier and endothelial injury may be involved in acute and long-term cognitive and physical impairment among critical care survivors.

Posted in Delirium Research, Investigator Spotlight, News and tagged , , , , .

One Comment

Leave a Reply